• Patrick Cox

9 reasons to #StopBrexit

Updated: Feb 9, 2019


Why should Brexit be cancelled? Here's all the reasons, from one to nine.

On Saturday, the People's Vote march saw more than 500,000 people take to the streets of London to call for a final say on Brexit

A People's Vote is the name for a 'ratification referendum'. Since there was no real clarity in 2016 what the vote to leave meant, it makes sense that once negotiations are concluded the final decision goes to the people.


In such a referendum there must be the option to remain in the EU. Article 50, which triggered the withdrawal of the UK from the EU, is fully revocable.


Here are 9 reasons why Brexit should, can and must be prevented.


1. There was never a plan


The Leave side never needed one. They have no interest in a plan. They're not capable of making a plan (about anything, it seems) and no plan exists that is better than remaining in the EU. In the months and months since the vote the Euro-obsessives haven't been able to come up with a plan. Before 2016 they had years to propose an alternative. In truth, no plan will ever emerge - and there really is no point in waiting any longer for them to formulate one.


2. The vote was manipulated


The referendum was skewed by those few people who might do better from coming out of the the EU. People and interests who will thrive in a downward market, those people able to make money from chaos, a fast buck from unhappiness. To adapt Stanley Baldwin's phrase: hard-faced men who look as though they'll do well out of the crisis.


3. Any Brexit is damaging


Britain is a country, but Britain exists in much larger world. We are an important part of Europe, but we are part of Europe. Cutting ourselves off from Europe will inevitable harm us. Brexit is the knife that cuts our nose clean from the face we apparently want to spite. The EU is by far our largest trading partner. Thousands of EU citizens live in the UK? No, 60+ million do - because we all get to enjoy the benefits of EU membership, freedom of movement, the single market, the lot. Brexit means a huge national loss. Hard Brexit, Soft Brexit, Chequers, Canada, Norway - they're just none of them as good as staying.


4. A no deal would be catastrophic


There's the frying pan of Brexit with a deal, and then there's the fire of no-deal. The UK government, in the 21st century, has appointed a food security minister. That's a Minister for the Department of Rationing. Name another country that in peacetime would willingly endanger food supplies, medical supplies, transport, education, science, the arts, industry, sport and everything besides in one fell swoop. No deal would be an act of political arson.


5. They've had a chance to come up with a plan


17m+ people voted to leave. The referendum was of very questionable legality, as well as of dubious constitutional legitimacy. None the less, people carried on. We respected the vote. We gave the Brexiteers a chance to put flesh on the bones of their back-of-a-cigarette-packet ideas. What have we got instead? In the words of the EU 'magical thinking'. The actual suggestion that sending Ireland back to the times of the Troubles would be a good idea. They're had a fair crack of the whip.


6. A People's Vote would be more democracy, not

less


Who knew exactly what they were voting for in June 2016? I'll wager most people read 'Remain' and 'Leave' on the ballot paper as 'Status Quo' and 'Shake-up'. Who thought that what we would end up with was this? People were promised a 'Brexit dividend'; instead we've got Ministers of the Crown assuring us their "won't be shortages" of medicine. Isn't it a fair idea to allow people to have a say on the terms of any deal Theresa May brings back from the EU? Democracy didn't end in June 2016. We should be allowed a People's Vote, with Remain as an option.


7. Brexit is the policy of a hypocrites


Champions of Leave said it would be about 'taking back control' and restoring British sovereignty. Except when you scratch beneath the surface those same people are actually not died-in-the-wool patriots, but in some form of hock to other international powers. Some are Atlanticists who love the US so much they want to import that way of life wholesale. Some have close ties to Russia and Putin. Many others are wedded to the creation of wealth that domestically and the stashing of the loot off-shore. All are hypocrites who would personally benefit enormously from leaving the EU and it's imperfect regulation of Anglo-Saxon capitalism.


8. The worst off would be hit hardest


Who would bear the brunt of the inevitable downturn, leading to job losses, even greater in-work insecurity, ever-growing resentment against incomers and those who look or sound a bit different? The most vulnerable, the poorest, women, minorities are the ones who will lose out, as they always lose out when change comes that is ill-thought through and done for someone else's gain. Leave don't represent the working class anymore than I represent Real Madrid.


9. We can change Europe from the inside


Was the status quo really that good? Not really. Are there other problems besides Brexit that needs addressing? There certainly are. The institutions of the EU are very far from being a perfect model of trans-continental governance. You'll have to forgive them because the EU are the only ones who have ever tried. In fact, make that us because we were part of the EU and shaped it's course as much as the others. If you want to change something, you don't break it, or simply walk away. I didn't think it was part of the national myth that we're a bunch of quitters. We could still roll our sleeves up and make the change from the inside.


Brexit is not inevitable. Brexit can be stopped.


#Brexit #Tories #Conservatives #ConservativeParty #May #BorisJohnson #DavidDavis #JacobReesMogg #PeoplesVote #FinalSay #StopBrexit #EU #WaithdrawalAgreement #UKnews #UKpolitics #UKcurrentaffairs

#Labour #LabourParty #Corbyn

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©2018, Patrick Cox